4th Symposium for Physician Executives: guest speakers and experts on conflict prevention and management

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu Evenements EN

4th Symposium for Physician Executives: guest speakers and experts on conflict prevention and management

Visuel Home ColloqueMG2018 ENHow can I motivate my team? How can I spot potential conflicts? How can I recognize a toxic individual? These are some of the questions that guest speakers and experts will answer during the QMA’s 4th Symposium for Physician Executives on the theme of “Avoiding conflict: from confrontation to collaboration,” which will be held on Friday, November 30 at Hôtel Vogue, in Montréal.

Dr. Hugo Viens, president of the Québec Medical Association, will open the symposium by recapping the recent provincial election and will review the new and current medical-political issues affecting physician executives.

Then, Mylaine Breton, associate professor in the Faculty of Medicine at Université de Sherbrooke, Luc Provost, CEO of the Association des cliniques médicales du Québec, and Dr. Jean Rodrigue will present examples of efficient medical organizational structures, as well as an analysis of modern clinical governance issues.

Pierre Lainey, full-time lecturer in the Management Department at HEC Montréal, will discuss how and when to demonstrate political savvy as a physician executive.

Andrée Cyr, coach and trainer, and Dr. Michel Desjardins will present a case study to help participants recognize the warning signs of a conflict.

Jean Poitras, professor in the Human Resources Management Department at HEC Montréal, will discuss concrete ways to make a team less vulnerable to toxic personalities.

The program is available on the symposium website (In French only).

The registration fee of $370 is unchanged from last year. Spaces are limited, so you should register quickly if you would like to attend.

To access the registration form, click here or go to colloqueamq.ca.

 

Back to top

Shared decision-making and virtual reality

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu AMQAction EN

Shared decision-making and virtual reality

During the convention of the Fédération des Médecins Omnipraticiens du Québec (FMOQ), with the theme of Le surdiagnostic et vous?, the QMA and Choisir avec soins Quebec presented a new tool for combating overdiagnosis and overtreatment. The tool, for which users must wear a virtual reality headset, is an application incorporating virtual reality and animation that enables physicians to immerse themselves in the very heart of shared decision-making.

Virtual reality is a very useful tool for simulating situations that are complex to reproduce in the real world. It also helps users see how they would react in real life and allows them to immediately review their practices.

SurdiagnosticFMOQ

When viewing the animated virtual reality application developed by the QMA and Choisir avec soins Quebec, you are present in a simulated consultation with a 50-year‑old patient who has come to see her physician for a pap test. Things get complicated when she mentions a letter she received about a breast cancer screening.

What follows is a discussion in which you can take part in deciding how the physician will respond. A moderator reviews your choice of treatment if it strays from best practices and advises you on the steps to follow to help your patient make an informed decision. 

If you are interested in this virtual reality experience, you can try it out during the QMA Symposium for Physician Executives and the QMA Annual Convention.

 

Back to top

New CAQ government appoints healthcare trio

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu CollineParlementaire EN

New CAQ government appoints healthcare trio

McCannIt’s a done deal. In his inauguration speech, Québec’s new premier, François Legault, revealed the names of the three people he has chosen to manage the healthcare portfolio, which he describe as “extraordinary people”. As announced during the election campaign, he appointed Danielle McCann as Minister of Health and Social Services. A trained social worker, Ms. McCann also has a Bachelor’s degree in Education and an MBA.

After having held several management positions at Montréal-area CLSCs and CHSLDs, she was put in charge of setting up the Centre de santé et de services sociaux du Sud-Ouest-Verdun, which involved merging an acute care hospital, two CLSCs, and three long-term care facilities. In 2012, she became the President-CEO of the Agence de santé et de services sociaux de Montréal. With a budget of more than $6 billion, she was responsible for coordinating services at more than 60 health and social services institutions. 

Upon being appointed Minister of Health, Ms. McCann declared that her priority would be to change the tone of interactions with her partners in the health and social services network.

Cooperation from the outset

“Cooperation and consultations are our main priorities. We plan to work with everyone—we’ll be meeting with doctors, nurses, social workers, and users,” she emphasized. She also intends to “decentralize a lot of things, in consultation with the teams.”

Ms. McCann also confirmed that her government “would put an end to the salary increases” and that it was important to speed up the process of obtaining comparative data with Ontario, as requested by the premier. She believes it’s possible to negotiate “in good faith” with specialists in order to find win-win solutions for physicians, citizens, and the entire network.

New minister appointed for seniors and informal caregivers

COLLINE BlaisMarguerite Blais has been appointed Minister responsible for Seniors and Informal Caregivers. Between 2007 and 2012, the former radio and TV host was the Minister responsible for Seniors under the Liberal government. She’s highly conversant with the issues related to seniors, but also with those affecting informal caregivers, having taken care of her husband after his diagnosis of a glioblastoma while she was still an MNA.

However, it’s difficult to say right now how far her powers will extend. While a “minister responsible for” is on equal footing with a full minister, also overseeing all related staff, activities, programs and credits of their portfolio, unlike a full minister, their duties may depend on what’s stated in the decree applicable to them. For example, they may be responsible for enforcing an entire act, or just a section of an act and the agencies arising from it.

A minister appointed for early childhood

CarmantDr. Lionel Carmant announced that he would be giving up medicine for the next four years to dedicate himself fully to his duties as a minister and an MNA. Until being elected on October 1, Dr. Carmant, a neurologist, was Chief of Neurology at CHU Sainte-Justine and professor of neuroscience and pediatrics at Université de Montréal.

As a minister of health and social services, he will oversee the early childhood and pediatric learning disorders portfolio. He will also head up the revision of the cannabis law adopted under Philippe Couillard’s government. The CAQ wants to make it clear that this issue will first and foremost be treated as a health matter. During the election campaign, the CAQ said it wanted to raise the legal age for buying cannabis from 18 to 21, and ban its use in public places. 

Health remains a priority for the new government. In his speech on election night, Mr. Legault repeated that his main mission was to make sure that “whenever a Québecer is sick, they can see a doctor or a nurse quickly without overcrowding the emergency department.” He also pledged that his government would “treat seniors with a loss of autonomy with all the dignity they deserve,” as well as provide better support for parents of disabled children and for informal caregivers.

Opposition critics

The new Minister of Health Danielle McCann won’t be answering to Gaétan Barrette in the National Assembly. Rather, Liberal MNA André Fortin, previously assigned to transport, will be the official opposition critic on health and public health.

The Parti Québécois’ health critic will be Sylvain Gaudreault, who will also shadow the environment, climate change and energy portfolios.

Finally, Sol Zanetti will be Québec Solidaire’s critic on health and social services, as well as on matters related to sovereignty, democratic institutions, and federal intergovernmental affairs.

 

Back to top

Students: It’s time to prepare for your CaRMS interviews!

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu ServiceMembres EN

Students: It’s time to prepare for your CaRMS interviews!

Upon completion of your medical studies, you have to pass Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) interviews. These interviews play a key role in your future professional career because they enable you to obtain a medical training position in a medical faculty in Canada.

Because this important and mandatory step can be fairly stressful, the Canadian Medical Association set up a free program to help you perfect your interview techniques and obtain advice from residents to improve your chances of obtaining the position you seek.

The following are some testimonials from students who participated in this program last year:

“This interview preparation session was extremely useful for me!
The feedback we each obtain from other students and residents is constructive,
friendly and directly applicable in interviews. I would recommend it for all!”

“The residents were attentive and gave very useful, constructive feedback.
Helped me kickstart my interview preparation and gave me a boost of confidence as well.”

“Very helpful! It gives a good idea of what interview questions
are like and we benefit from all the helpful insight.”

This program is offered from November to January. The dates will be announced shortly.
To learn more, go to cma.ca.  

 

Back to top

Incoming 2018−2019 Student Committee!

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu AMQAction EN

Incoming 2018−2019 Student Committee!

The new President of the Student Committee of the Québec Medical Association has just put together her team for 2018−2019. Representatives of the four faculties of medicine will work together with Salma Rehimini (see interview with Ms. Rehimini), who is taking over from outgoing President Alexandre Elhalwi, who is now a member of the QMA Board of Directors and continues to build on his experience acquired with the Committee. A vote of thanks to Alexandre for his commitment and leadership during his two-year term as President, as well as to the students who have left the team.

The new Committee members:

Université Laval

  • Mihn-Duc Ngo
  • Julie Abou Samra
  • Isabelle Desbiens

Université de Sherbrooke

  • Stéphanie Roux
  • Nickolas Gagnon
  • Davy Vanderweyen

Université de Montréal

  • Catherine Nguyen
  • Raymond Rui Min Zuo
  • Angèle Lam Giang Trinh, outgoing Vice-President

McGill University

  • Anson Lee
  • Lara Fesdekjian
  • Alexandre Elhalwi, outgoing President
  • Vanessa Danielova, Vice-President
  • Salma Rehimini, President

 

Back to top

Twitter and Facebook messages of the month

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu ReseauxSociaux EN

Are you interested in the latest medical news, the future of the medical profession and health issues? Then join our community in the social media, where the opinion leaders express their views! Our communities are growing. Follow us and connect with us!

twitter @amquebec

facebook www.facebook.com/AMQ.QUEBEC

 

Messages on Twitter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Messages on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back to top

Mathieu Nadeau-Vallée: leadership in research

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu MembresAction EN

Whenever it meets with physicians in their environment, the QMA has observed that many of its members are committed to improving care and services on a daily basis. Great initiatives are taking shape everywhere. Some of them should even be implemented or adapted elsewhere, but for this to happen, we need to know that they exist! 

If you have set up a project that deserves more visibility or if you know of members colleagues who have done so, feel free to contact QMA. We would be pleased to showcase your achievements.

Mathieu Nadeau-Vallée: leadership in research

Mathieu Nadeau Vallee2Third-year medical student and member of the QMA, Mathieu Nadeau-Vallée recently won a Canadian Medical Hall of Fame Award. Since 2015, the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame has acknowledged second-year medical students who have demonstrated community leadership, strong communication skills, and an interest in advancing knowledge. Each university can nominate one candidate.

“The award was mostly for my research work,” said Mr. Nadeau-Vallée. During his Ph.D. in pharmacology, under the supervision of Dr. Sylvain Chemtob, neonatologist, pharmacologist and researcher at CHU Sainte-Justine, Mr. Nadeau-Vallée conducted research on reducing the risks of premature birth.

Currently, about 10% of babies worldwide are born premature. Because we still don’t know how to prevent it, prematurity is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality. “For now, all we have to go on is the patient’s history of preterm labour or the length of the cervix measured on ultrasound at certain points in the pregnancy. At best, we’re able to detect 10% of the actual population at risk, which is not nearly enough,” said Mr. Nadeau-Vallée.

Reducing uterine inflammation to prevent premature births

When Mr. Nadeau-Vallée met Dr. Chemtob, the latter was working on anti-inflammatories as a way to reduce the number of premature births. Mr. Nadeau-Vallée expressed his interest in working with Dr. Chemtob, who told him about a molecule he and his colleagues had developed for testing on mice. This therapeutic agent is a tiny molecule, much smaller than those developed to date to target interleukin-1, a messenger closely linked to inflammation of the tissues in the uterus. “It was believed that inflammation played a conclusive role in preterm labour,” explained Mr. Nadeau-Vallée, “and, in fact, when we administered it to mice that showed signs of giving birth prematurely, they actually gave birth at term to healthy young.”

A first! Up to this point, by targeting interleukin-1, researchers were interfering with the fetus’s basic defence mechanisms, causing harmful side effects in both the fetus and the mother. Conversely, the molecule co-developed by Dr. Chemtob has a beneficial effect on both prematurity and fetal health. With his colleague and fellow medical student Alexandra Beaudry‑Richard, Mr. Nadeau-Vallée just published a new article in Nature Scientific Reports, in which he shares his latest work. “We administered the molecule to mice showing signs of giving birth prematurely, but this time focused on retinal development in the young, because we know that premature babies are at risk of blindness due to retinopathy of prematurity.” Once again, the results are conclusive, and the molecule is capable of reversing the inflammation in mice and of producing very good results in terms of retinopathy.

Combining clinical practice with fundamental research

Mathieu Nadeau Vallee1Just like his mentor, Mr. Nadeau-Vallée wants to become a clinician-researcher, which is why he enrolled in medical school at the same time as his Ph.D. in pharmacology. In his opinion, having a background in fundamental research and a career as a clinician is the ideal scenario for “generating clinical hypotheses and then being able to test them in the lab.”

He already has experience teaching applied fundamental science courses at Université de Montréal’s Faculty of Medicine. “It’s important to give this type of course to people who are interested in medicine,” he explained. In fact, he often sees students in his program spending summers working in labs. He also doesn’t hesitate to approach Dr. Chemtob with his ideas. “I reached out to him as a researcher, but I ended up meeting a potential mentor with whom I really enjoyed having scientific discussions,” he said.

Mr. Nadeau-Vallée is considering the possibility of doing a residency in Internal Medicine. “I’m very curious by nature. I like to get to the bottom of things, and I think the diagnostic aspect in Internal Medicine is very interesting.” In the meantime, he’s working on his thesis and pursuing his medical studies.

Students Olivia Monton from McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine, Dax Bourcier from Université de Sherbrooke’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, and Mathieu Allard from Université Laval’s Faculty of Medicine were also 2018 recipients of a Canadian Medical Hall of Fame Award.

 

Back to top

 

 

 
Rules of Moderation for Comments Submitted to QMA-Info

Wishing to promote quality discussions among its members, the QMA welcomes your opinions and invites you to comment on its articles. But first, we would like to lay down a few rules to ensure a tone of moderation in members’ comments.
To begin with, your comments will be read before they are published—not to censure the content, but rather to ensure a friendly forum for discussion.  
So, in order for your comments to be published, we ask you to abide by the following rules:

• Do not overuse capital letters: putting everything you want to say in capital letters is akin to shouting;
• Avoid making discriminatory statements: obviously, statements that may be construed as racist or sexist will not be tolerated;
• Refrain from making aggressive or violent statements: you are free to disagree with something you’ve read, but avoid overreacting;
• Do not insult people: As physicians, we must foster collegiality in our communications with one other.

Our goal, of course, is to promote good discussions.
Thank you for your understanding.

 

 

To comment on this article or view the other comments, click here.
Comments in both languages are grouped in the French version.

Panel on the future of family medicine

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu AMQAction EN

Panel on the future of family medicine

ACTION Panel MedecinsdefamilleDr. Hugo Viens, president of the QMA, recently participated in a panel on the future of family medicine organized by McGill University’s Department of Family Medicine and moderated by its director, Dr. Howard Bergman. Some one hundred students from all medical faculties across Québec and at the University of Ottawa came to hear the discussions with Dr. Julie Lalancette, director of planning and regionalization at the FMOQ, Dr. Guillaume Charbonneau, president of the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CCFP), and Dr. Frédéric Turgeon, president of the Collège québécois des médecins de famille (CQMF).

Dr. Lalancette opened the debate by remarking that there’s still a lot of work to be done on work‑life balance and the integration of professionals before we can progress from collaboration to teamwork. However, she believes that the next few years are most likely to be marked by digital health-related issues and their impact on doctor-patient relationships, but especially by the economic challenges facing the healthcare system. In a public healthcare system, doctors can’t simply ignore cost control measures, and need to keep a close eye on their practice and the appropriateness of their medical acts.

Moving in the right direction

Despite the huge black cloud hanging over the medical profession in general, and family medicine in particular in Québec, Dr. Charbonneau thinks the practice is just as strong, if not more so, than it was ten years ago, and that this will continue to be the case. While the clouds may shift according to the prevailing political winds, they’ve always been there, and we need to trust in medical organizations to guide us through the storm.

The president of the CFMC reviewed the various missions of the medical colleges and federations, pointing out that in Québec we also have the QMA which, unlike in other provinces, plays a mainly innovative role. All of these organizations exist to support family medicine, which is why the practice will have an even bigger role to play in 10 years’ time.

According to Dr. Charbonneau, Québec is headed in the right direction with doctors having abandoned solo practice in favour of family medicine groups, allowing them to work in teams with other professionals. So, really, we’ve already adopted the model of the future.

He also believes that doctors in the very near future will finally have access to information that will allow them to improve the practice and traditional professional development activities. Lastly, while more and more patients are able to see their family doctors on a daily basis, access to medical specialists will also be improved and the latter will have to start being more accountable.

The doctor as support person

Dr. Turgeon remarked that society has changed a great deal since he first started practising medicine, but that the patient relationship is still the foundation of family medicine. A family doctor actually follows a patient for their whole life, resulting in a meaningful and profound connection—a connection that Dr. Turgeon actually thinks will become even more important as time goes on.

Society is racing ahead, and while Google can be goldmine of information, it can also be a bottomless pit, he explained. People need constancy. The family doctor is uniquely positioned to convey this message and to support people through all the changes taking place in society.

He also pointed out that we’re seeing major changes on the ground. Currently, more than 7,000 of Québec’s 9,000 practising family physicians work in family medicine groups, which don’t exist anywhere else in Canada. And, while the data show that there are significant advantages to working in large teams, family medicine groups continue to expand.

And the best is yet to come, because we’re still learning and figuring out all the operational and functional possibilities that teamwork affords. Only the future will tell whether we’re witnessing an evolution or a revolution, but one thing is certain: Family medicine will have a strong coordination and communication role to play through these front-line teams.

A generation of born leaders

In introducing Dr. Viens, Dr. Howard Bergman stressed the very important role of the QMA, an outstanding Québec-based organization that stimulates debate on health policies and innovation. The president of the QMA started by explaining to the students that they have talent and knowledge that their predecessors did not, reminding them, for example, that when he was in high school, the one and only computer at his school was used to search for books in the library! He believes that the new generation are born leaders, accustomed to having an opinion, expressing their thoughts, and doing what needs to be done to make things better. He’s confident that, even though the situation seems a bit bleak at the moment, the healthcare system will evolve for the better in the coming years.

Already, most family doctors work in teams instead of alone, and there are now tools for contacting specialists and communicating between professionals—tools that the new generation have a much easier time adopting than older doctors. The family medicine of the future will therefore focus on meeting the needs of patients, rather than those of the healthcare system or organizations.

Doctors have a responsibility to make sure the public healthcare system stays viable in the long term. In terms of guaranteeing good population health, we now know that social determinants of health are more important than healthcare systems themselves, which is why it’s crucial that we improve care trajectories and make them less costly, as well as implement more integrative practices. As Dr. Viens pointed out, this is within reach for doctors, who need to step up and be leaders in overhauling the healthcare system, being best positioned as they are to implement a multidisciplinary approach, a review of compensation methods, and a reorganization of healthcare systems and, above all, the teamwork model.

 

Back to top

In your own opinion, what are the main factors responsible for physicians' burnout?

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu Sondage EN

 

Results from the September End-of-Life Care Survey

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu Sondage EN

Results from the September End-of-Life Care Survey

 

Salma Rehimini: President of the QMA’s Student Committee

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu AMQAction EN

Salma Rehimini: President of the QMA’s Student Committee

ACTION SalmaA second-year medical student at McGill University and the new president of the Québec Medical Association’s Student Committee, Salma Rehimini knew from a very young age that she wanted to take care of others. “I preferred my toy doctor’s kit over my dolls,” she remarked, “and I always liked taking care of my mother or grandmother when they were sick.”

Over the years, her ambitions have crystallized into the belief that everything stems from health. “Our health is the most important thing we can have. Without it, we’re nothing. And that’s why I’ve always made it a priority and guarded it fiercely,” she said. It just so happens that health became her driving force, in school and in her own personal endeavours—something this student has never lacked for.

A recognized leader

In college, she began working with young girls from her community to help them “find their place in society as women.” She was also a co-founder of Exporte Supporte, which collects school supplies for underprivileged children. Her good grades and many achievements earned her a nomination for a Loran Award. Offered in full partnership with 25 Canadian universities, this scholarship is given out annually to 30 students considered to be potential leaders of tomorrow. The winners, who receive $100,000 over four years, are paired with a mentor during their studies and have the opportunity to complete highly formative summer internships. “The money is great, of course,” explained Ms. Rehimini, “but it’s really the relationships you build, even during the selection process, with other student leaders from across Canada and from all backgrounds and walks of life that are priceless.”

One project at a time

Singled out as a leader from a very young age, Ms. Rehimini nevertheless doesn’t believe in the notion of “women leaders.” “Leadership is a universal concept—it’s not specific to one gender or one person.” And while not everyone needs to become a leader, anyone who wants to can. All it takes is “to be a hard-working person with a strong desire to lead a team toward a common goal.”

Born into very politically conscious family and herself interested in politics, Ms. Rehimini was quick to get involved with the QMA after starting medical school. The QMA interviewed her about her dedication to the Student Committee.

QMA-INFO: What made you decide to get involved with the QMA’s Student Committee?

Salma Rehimini: It’s not every day you get the opportunity to develop your political acumen. The QMA is an association that emphasizes the professionalism and the medical and political education of young medical students. When I first started in medicine, the Student Committee told us how much the QMA values these qualities, and how important it is for medical students have a grounding in politics because, as doctors, we’re also leaders with a duty to advocate for and defend our profession.

QMA-INFO: And this resonates with you?

I love this philosophy, because it’s truly what I believe, and when I realized there was actually an organization that operates based on this philosophy and these values, I was completely won over and rushed to sign on. After being an active member last year, this year I wanted to take it to the next level, so I ran for president.

QMA-INFO: What do you hope to contribute?

The QMA’s Student Committee has outstanding values and solid objectives. But we haven’t been around for very long and, in the past few years, the Committee has undergone several major changes in its internal administration, its projects, and its way of working. So, we’re still pondering how fast we need to move things forward, which activities we need to keep, which ones we need to add, etc. During my term this year, I’d like to get the Committee onto solid footing and create a certain structured routine. I want to build a solid foundation. We’re becoming more well-known with each passing year; our reach is expanding, which is nice to see, but to keeping growing, we need a strong foundation. So that’s what I’ll try to build this year—a solid foundation—so we can keep going with our remarkable great expansion, which I would even describe as exponential.

QMA-INFO: Which projects matter most to you?

We support student-led initiatives. Each year, we grant more and more funding for these projects, which we’re very happy about, because this shows our colleagues that we support them and their leadership, which, unfortunately, isn’t a big enough focus in our curriculum. I like this project because we give students a forum where they can demonstrate their leadership, we give them an environment where they can carry out their initiatives.

QMA-INFO: Where do you hope to see the medical profession five years from now?

I’m hoping that we’ll really be able to improve the social contract we have with our patients. It’s very, very disappointing to see that patients today don’t trust us like they used to, or that they think we’re not as compassionate or even as competent as we were before. It’s so disappointing because the patient-doctor relationship is the cornerstone of medicine. To think that we’ve come up short in that area feels like a complete failure to me. But my greatest hope is that we’ll be able to rebuild that bond of trust with the patient.

QMA-INFO: Why is it so important?

That bond of trust is the very foundation of our work. Personally, it’s why I chose to become a doctor—for the relationship with the patient, to be able to talk to patients and help them. But how can I help them if they don’t trust me? So, I truly believe we’ll be able to repair this trust through our dedication, through our desire to be more aware as future doctors about what patients are going through and about the needs of medicine today. We also need to keep looking for other solutions, because even though we’re coming up with some, I’m sure there are lots of others. And I can only hope that we’ll keep working on this aspect, because it’s really central to our profession. You can’t consider yourself a doctor—or at least a good doctor—without it.

 

Back to top

 

 

 
Rules of Moderation for Comments Submitted to QMA-Info

Wishing to promote quality discussions among its members, the QMA welcomes your opinions and invites you to comment on its articles. But first, we would like to lay down a few rules to ensure a tone of moderation in members’ comments.
To begin with, your comments will be read before they are published—not to censure the content, but rather to ensure a friendly forum for discussion.  
So, in order for your comments to be published, we ask you to abide by the following rules:

• Do not overuse capital letters: putting everything you want to say in capital letters is akin to shouting;
• Avoid making discriminatory statements: obviously, statements that may be construed as racist or sexist will not be tolerated;
• Refrain from making aggressive or violent statements: you are free to disagree with something you’ve read, but avoid overreacting;
• Do not insult people: As physicians, we must foster collegiality in our communications with one other.

Our goal, of course, is to promote good discussions.
Thank you for your understanding.

 

 

To comment on this article or view the other comments, click here.
Comments in both languages are grouped in the French version.

A CMA survey finds high levels of burnout among Canadian physicians

Banniere AMQInfo page web Octobre2018 ENG

Bandeau pageContenu Partenaires EN

A CMA survey finds high levels of burnout among Canadian physicians

On October 10, the Canadian Medical Association released the report of the CMA National Physician Health Survey: A National Snapshot. This study responds to the issue of improving physician health and wellness. According to this report, while 82% of physicians and residents reported high resilience, more than one in four reported high levels of burnout and one in three screened positive for depression, suggesting that the issue is broader than individual factors and extends to other systemic factors.

This survey of Canadian physicians shows that medical residents are 48% more likely to report burnout, and 95% more likely to screen positive for depression. Women physicians are more likely than their male counterparts to report burnout (23% more) and more likely to screen positive for depression (32% more).

Most of the physicians said they were aware of the physician health services available to them, but many of them did not use these services mainly because they don't dare to seek help or believed the situation was not severe enough.

Physician health is a major concern because “[…] Poor physician health not only affects physicians individually, but studies have shown it can have an impact on patient care,” explains Dr. Gigi Osler, President of the CMA. “It's important to shed light on areas where we can and must do better to support physicians, especially in the early years of their careers.”

To read all of the findings of this survey, go to the CMA National Physician Health Survey: A National Snapshot.

 

Back to top